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  • Speed differences lead to accidents

    Speed differences lead to accidents
    • Speed differences lead to accidents

    • 3 rights you could lose if convicted of a crime

      If you face criminal charges, you must understand the full scope of a conviction. Financial penalties or jail time will be devastating enough, yet some of the consequences will last much longer.

      A conviction will impinge on several civil rights, aside from your right to walk around in freedom. Here are three to be aware of:

      The right to vote

      All citizens gain this once they reach the age of majority.  However, North Carolina bans people convicted of a felony from voting while in prison, on probation or on parole. A new ruling found that people should regain their voting rights once they leave prison. Whether it is upheld depends on if anyone appeals. Even so, you could well miss out on some important elections.

      The right to see your kids

      As a parent, you expect to see your children, and they expect to see you. If a judge puts you behind bars, you will hardly see them at all until you are out. It could also harm your chances of getting a share of custody or visitation rights when you are out. Or, it could help your co-parent convince a court to permit them to move far away with your kids.

      The right to work

      Some inmates get to work, but you are hardly going to further your career when locked away from the outside world. However promising your pre-conviction career was, you may struggle to find employment after. Many employers will not even look at your application when your criminal record shows in a background check.

      The best way to protect your rights is to avoid a conviction in the first place. If you face criminal charges, seek urgent legal help to assess your defense options.

    • Long shifts lead to commercial drivers doing dangerous things

      Almost everything that you buy at local retail shops comes off of the back of commercial vehicles. Truckers help keep the economy running by offering over-land transportation for everything from unprocessed milk to new vehicles fresh from the manufacturer.

      The demands of the American economy never stop, which means that there is a lot of pressure on transportation professionals. They often work long shifts when compared with employees in other professions. The demands of their jobs mean that they may go several days away from home at a time depending on who employs them and what kind of route they drive.

      All of the demands associated with commercial transportation at work may make these professional drivers more susceptible to dangerous driving distractions. What distractions are common issues for those who drive all day?

      Eating and drinking are dangerous driving habits

      Approximately 56% of drivers admit that they eat while driving occasionally, and a shocking 7% of drivers eat at the wheel every day. Older drivers are more likely to eat at the wheel, with 13% of Baby Boomers admitting that they eat or drink while driving every day.

      Although a lot of people eat while driving, it is a known safety risk. It makes someone take their hands off the wheel and creates the risk that they will have a startle reaction if they spill something. While a trucker may just need a snack to keep their blood sugar stable and their body fueled for the job, there is risk every time they eat while driving.

      Isolation can lead to digital distraction

      There is a federal no text rule that applies even in states where the law does not forbid phone use at the wheel. The sad truth is that many commercial drivers will feel compelled to break that rule because of how long they go without seeing their loved ones. Whether they want to stave off fatigue or touch base with their children, they may dial the phone or respond to a text message when they have control over a commercial truck.

      Distraction is dangerous for any driver, but especially for those in control of large, difficult-to-control commercial vehicles. Understanding risk factors that increase the chances of a motor vehicle collision can help drivers minimize risk and make better decisions on the road.

    • The types of damages in a personal injury claim

      Personal injury claims are designed to help you recover compensation for injuries and losses you incur due to another person or entity’s negligence or wrongful act. If you are a victim of this type of accident, you may wonder what type of damages you can recover.

      While each accident is unique and has unique specifications, some general damages apply to almost every case. Keep reading to learn what these are.

      Compensatory damages

      Compensatory damages include economic and non-economic damages.

      Economic damages are the ones that have a definitive total, thanks to receipts and other documentation. Some examples of economic damages you can recover in your personal injury claim include:

      •         Medical bills (past, present and future related to the accident)
      •         Loss of wages
      •         Property damage

      These are just a few examples.

      Non-economic damages are more challenging to quantify. That’s because they are subjective and based on the injuries and damages caused by the accident. Because of this, non-economic damages are typically extremely different from one case to the next.

      Some examples of non-economic compensatory damages include:

      •         Mental anguish
      •         Pain and suffering
      •         Loss of enjoyment of life

      Punitive damages

      In some cases of negligence or malice, punitive damages can also be recovered. These damages are specifically meant to punish the at-fault party. Remember that these damages are only awarded in the most egregious cases.

      Recovering compensation for your personal injury accident

      If you file a personal injury lawsuit against someone, knowing the types of damages you can recover can be beneficial. Each case is unique, so the type and amount of damages you receive will vary.

    • Were you at fault for your workplace accident?

      If you cause or partly contribute to a workplace accident where you suffered injuries, you may be at a loss regarding your eligibility for workers’ compensation benefits. In the face of substantial medical bills or potential loss of wages, your concerns are legitimate.

      Here is what you need to know if you find yourself in such a situation.

      Workers’ compensation is a no-fault system

      A no-fault system means that emphasis is placed on compensating the victim rather than finding out whether they were liable or not. Therefore, you can still recover compensation benefits even if you were partially or fully responsible for your accident as long as it was related to your job. Workers’ compensation does not usually cover accidents beyond your employment scope.

      Additionally, there are instances where your claim may be denied even if the accident occurred at the workplace. For example, if you were intoxicated at the time or your actions were intentional, you may not receive any benefits. Equally, if you ignore obvious safety measures put in place by your employer, your compensation claim may be dismissed.

      Protecting your rights

      Even if you were at fault, you need to follow through with your workplace accident like you would any other. This includes making your employer aware on time; otherwise, your claim could be time-barred.

      Remember, you have a right to compensation for a valid workplace injury claim. However, you may encounter hitches with your claim ranging from frustration by your employer to issues with the insurer regarding your claim. Therefore, it is important to be aware of your rights and protect them throughout the claims process. Knowing what to expect at every stage will ease everything for you and help you prepare yourself if your claim is denied.

    • Can a DWI hurt my career prospects?

      Career journeys can come with setbacks. But if that setback is a DUI conviction, it could pose some difficulties. That’s because consequences can vary depending on a person’s job industry.

      Even if it’s just a misdemeanor, it could narrow one’s prospects.

      How to talk about a DUI in an interview

      Employers typically conduct background checks before hiring someone. Depending on the industry, a DUI could signal a significant red flag.

      It can be awkward talking about a DUI in an interview. However, a conviction doesn’t make someone unqualified for a job. It’s still possible to pass by being honest and reflective about the experience:

      • Tell the employer about the charge (only if they ask).
      • Discuss how the experience was a lesson learned.
      • Reiterate that they won’t make the same mistake ever again.
      • State how the conviction won’t have an impact on their performance.

      However, one should note that DUI convictions can limit career opportunities in industries like medicine, law, education and health care. That’s because these fields can be highly competitive and may reject those with a criminal conviction.

      Impacts on job searches

      Aside from the hiring process, DUIs can impact job searches in other ways. For instance, one may have their license suspended, which could affect their ability to get to interviews without being late or raising suspicions.

      Convictions don’t have to stick forever

      Everyone makes a mistake and don’t deserve to have it define them for the rest of their lives. If you have been charged with driving while impaired, call our driving while impaired criminal defense attorney today.

    • 3 safety tips for sharing the road with big rigs

      Semi-trucks, sometimes called big rigs, are a common sight along the highways of North Carolina. They’re crucial for transporting goods and merchandise and usually make long hauls to do so. But because of their size, they can be intimidating to share the road with.

      If you’re not careful, semi-trucks can also be dangerous. Though you can’t control how attentive or reliable a semi-truck driver is, there are safety measures you can take to help avoid devastating collisions.

      1. Stay out of a truck’s blind spots

      The length and size of a big rig truck means that it has several blind spots. These danger zones can lead to catastrophic accidents if you find yourself lingering in them.

      Generally, a truck’s blind spots are located along the sides and directly behind and in front of them. The right side in particular is a large blind spot that can span two lanes because the driver sits on the opposite side of the truck.

      To avoid cruising in a truck driver’s blind spots, signal clearly and pass them quickly and cautiously. Also, avoid tailgating by giving yourself plenty of space between the front end of your vehicle and the back end of a truck. A helpful tip to remember is that if you can’t see the truck driver in their side mirrors, chances are they can’t see you either.

      2. Be mindful of turn lanes

      Semi-trucks take wide turns. So, they need ample room from all drivers for making both left and right-handed turns. If there are two turn lanes available, a truck will most likely be in the furthest lane from the curb or the centerline depending on which way they’re turning.

      When you pull up on the inside of a truck that needs to make a turn, chances are when they make their wide turn, they’ll hit you. It’s better to remain behind a truck rather than try to squeeze past them.

      3. Avoid cutting in front of a truck

      Cutting off a truck can result in a collision for a number of reasons. Semi-trucks and other large commercial vehicles take longer to come to a stop. So, if you cut in front of them unexpectedly, they won’t have the time they need to slow down and avoid rear-ending you.

      Additionally, as mentioned above, cutting directly in front of a semi-truck means you’re moving right into one of their blind spots. Before pulling in front of a semi-truck, always make sure you can see the full front of the truck in your side mirrors. Even then, it never hurts to wait a little longer to leave an extra cushion between you.

      Remembering these tips and using caution in the presence of big rig trucks can help you stay safe while sharing the road with semis. Our Charlotte Personal Injury Lawyer handles accident cases throughout the Carolinas. Contact us today if you have any questions.

    • 3 Safety Tips for Sharing the Road with Big Rigs

      Semi-trucks, sometimes called big rigs, are a common sight along the highways of North Carolina. They’re crucial for transporting goods and merchandise and usually make long hauls to do so. But because of their size, they can be intimidating to share the road with.

      If you’re not careful, semi-trucks can also be dangerous. Though you can’t control how attentive or reliable a semi-truck driver is, there are safety measures you can take to help avoid devastating collisions.

      1. Stay out of a truck’s blind spots

      The length and size of a big rig truck means that it has several blind spots. These danger zones can lead to catastrophic accidents if you find yourself lingering in them.

      Generally, a truck’s blind spots are located along the sides and directly behind and in front of them. The right side in particular is a large blind spot that can span two lanes because the driver sits on the opposite side of the truck.

      To avoid cruising in a truck driver’s blind spots, signal clearly and pass them quickly and cautiously. Also, avoid tailgating by giving yourself plenty of space between the front end of your vehicle and the back end of a truck. A helpful tip to remember is that if you can’t see the truck driver in their side mirrors, chances are they can’t see you either.

      2. Be mindful of turn lanes

      Semi-trucks take wide turns. So, they need ample room from all drivers for making both left and right-handed turns. If there are two turn lanes available, a truck will most likely be in the furthest lane from the curb or the centerline depending on which way they’re turning.

      When you pull up on the inside of a truck that needs to make a turn, chances are when they make their wide turn, they’ll hit you. It’s better to remain behind a truck rather than try to squeeze past them.

      3. Avoid cutting in front of a truck

      Cutting off a truck can result in a collision for a number of reasons. Semi-trucks and other large commercial vehicles take longer to come to a stop. So, if you cut in front of them unexpectedly, they won’t have the time they need to slow down and avoid rear-ending you.

      Additionally, as mentioned above, cutting directly in front of a semi-truck means you’re moving right into one of their blind spots. Before pulling in front of a semi-truck, always make sure you can see the full front of the truck in your side mirrors. Even then, it never hurts to wait a little longer to leave an extra cushion between you.

      Remembering these tips and using caution in the presence of big rig trucks can help you stay safe while sharing the road with semis.

  • 3 rights you could lose if convicted of a crime

    If you face criminal charges, you must understand the full scope of a conviction. Financial penalties or jail time will be devastating enough, yet some of the consequences will last much longer.

    A conviction will impinge on several civil rights, aside from your right to walk around in freedom. Here are three to be aware of:

    The right to vote

    All citizens gain this once they reach the age of majority.  However, North Carolina bans people convicted of a felony from voting while in prison, on probation or on parole. A new ruling found that people should regain their voting rights once they leave prison. Whether it is upheld depends on if anyone appeals. Even so, you could well miss out on some important elections.

    The right to see your kids

    As a parent, you expect to see your children, and they expect to see you. If a judge puts you behind bars, you will hardly see them at all until you are out. It could also harm your chances of getting a share of custody or visitation rights when you are out. Or, it could help your co-parent convince a court to permit them to move far away with your kids.

    The right to work

    Some inmates get to work, but you are hardly going to further your career when locked away from the outside world. However promising your pre-conviction career was, you may struggle to find employment after. Many employers will not even look at your application when your criminal record shows in a background check.

    The best way to protect your rights is to avoid a conviction in the first place. If you face criminal charges, seek urgent legal help to assess your defense options.

  • Long shifts lead to commercial drivers doing dangerous things

    Almost everything that you buy at local retail shops comes off of the back of commercial vehicles. Truckers help keep the economy running by offering over-land transportation for everything from unprocessed milk to new vehicles fresh from the manufacturer.

    The demands of the American economy never stop, which means that there is a lot of pressure on transportation professionals. They often work long shifts when compared with employees in other professions. The demands of their jobs mean that they may go several days away from home at a time depending on who employs them and what kind of route they drive.

    All of the demands associated with commercial transportation at work may make these professional drivers more susceptible to dangerous driving distractions. What distractions are common issues for those who drive all day?

    Eating and drinking are dangerous driving habits

    Approximately 56% of drivers admit that they eat while driving occasionally, and a shocking 7% of drivers eat at the wheel every day. Older drivers are more likely to eat at the wheel, with 13% of Baby Boomers admitting that they eat or drink while driving every day.

    Although a lot of people eat while driving, it is a known safety risk. It makes someone take their hands off the wheel and creates the risk that they will have a startle reaction if they spill something. While a trucker may just need a snack to keep their blood sugar stable and their body fueled for the job, there is risk every time they eat while driving.

    Isolation can lead to digital distraction

    There is a federal no text rule that applies even in states where the law does not forbid phone use at the wheel. The sad truth is that many commercial drivers will feel compelled to break that rule because of how long they go without seeing their loved ones. Whether they want to stave off fatigue or touch base with their children, they may dial the phone or respond to a text message when they have control over a commercial truck.

    Distraction is dangerous for any driver, but especially for those in control of large, difficult-to-control commercial vehicles. Understanding risk factors that increase the chances of a motor vehicle collision can help drivers minimize risk and make better decisions on the road.

  • The types of damages in a personal injury claim

    Personal injury claims are designed to help you recover compensation for injuries and losses you incur due to another person or entity’s negligence or wrongful act. If you are a victim of this type of accident, you may wonder what type of damages you can recover.

    While each accident is unique and has unique specifications, some general damages apply to almost every case. Keep reading to learn what these are.

    Compensatory damages

    Compensatory damages include economic and non-economic damages.

    Economic damages are the ones that have a definitive total, thanks to receipts and other documentation. Some examples of economic damages you can recover in your personal injury claim include:

    •         Medical bills (past, present and future related to the accident)
    •         Loss of wages
    •         Property damage

    These are just a few examples.

    Non-economic damages are more challenging to quantify. That’s because they are subjective and based on the injuries and damages caused by the accident. Because of this, non-economic damages are typically extremely different from one case to the next.

    Some examples of non-economic compensatory damages include:

    •         Mental anguish
    •         Pain and suffering
    •         Loss of enjoyment of life

    Punitive damages

    In some cases of negligence or malice, punitive damages can also be recovered. These damages are specifically meant to punish the at-fault party. Remember that these damages are only awarded in the most egregious cases.

    Recovering compensation for your personal injury accident

    If you file a personal injury lawsuit against someone, knowing the types of damages you can recover can be beneficial. Each case is unique, so the type and amount of damages you receive will vary.

  • Were you at fault for your workplace accident?

    If you cause or partly contribute to a workplace accident where you suffered injuries, you may be at a loss regarding your eligibility for workers’ compensation benefits. In the face of substantial medical bills or potential loss of wages, your concerns are legitimate.

    Here is what you need to know if you find yourself in such a situation.

    Workers’ compensation is a no-fault system

    A no-fault system means that emphasis is placed on compensating the victim rather than finding out whether they were liable or not. Therefore, you can still recover compensation benefits even if you were partially or fully responsible for your accident as long as it was related to your job. Workers’ compensation does not usually cover accidents beyond your employment scope.

    Additionally, there are instances where your claim may be denied even if the accident occurred at the workplace. For example, if you were intoxicated at the time or your actions were intentional, you may not receive any benefits. Equally, if you ignore obvious safety measures put in place by your employer, your compensation claim may be dismissed.

    Protecting your rights

    Even if you were at fault, you need to follow through with your workplace accident like you would any other. This includes making your employer aware on time; otherwise, your claim could be time-barred.

    Remember, you have a right to compensation for a valid workplace injury claim. However, you may encounter hitches with your claim ranging from frustration by your employer to issues with the insurer regarding your claim. Therefore, it is important to be aware of your rights and protect them throughout the claims process. Knowing what to expect at every stage will ease everything for you and help you prepare yourself if your claim is denied.

  • Can a DWI hurt my career prospects?

    Career journeys can come with setbacks. But if that setback is a DUI conviction, it could pose some difficulties. That’s because consequences can vary depending on a person’s job industry.

    Even if it’s just a misdemeanor, it could narrow one’s prospects.

    How to talk about a DUI in an interview

    Employers typically conduct background checks before hiring someone. Depending on the industry, a DUI could signal a significant red flag.

    It can be awkward talking about a DUI in an interview. However, a conviction doesn’t make someone unqualified for a job. It’s still possible to pass by being honest and reflective about the experience:

    • Tell the employer about the charge (only if they ask).
    • Discuss how the experience was a lesson learned.
    • Reiterate that they won’t make the same mistake ever again.
    • State how the conviction won’t have an impact on their performance.

    However, one should note that DUI convictions can limit career opportunities in industries like medicine, law, education and health care. That’s because these fields can be highly competitive and may reject those with a criminal conviction.

    Impacts on job searches

    Aside from the hiring process, DUIs can impact job searches in other ways. For instance, one may have their license suspended, which could affect their ability to get to interviews without being late or raising suspicions.

    Convictions don’t have to stick forever

    Everyone makes a mistake and don’t deserve to have it define them for the rest of their lives. If you have been charged with driving while impaired, call our driving while impaired criminal defense attorney today.

  • 3 safety tips for sharing the road with big rigs

    Semi-trucks, sometimes called big rigs, are a common sight along the highways of North Carolina. They’re crucial for transporting goods and merchandise and usually make long hauls to do so. But because of their size, they can be intimidating to share the road with.

    If you’re not careful, semi-trucks can also be dangerous. Though you can’t control how attentive or reliable a semi-truck driver is, there are safety measures you can take to help avoid devastating collisions.

    1. Stay out of a truck’s blind spots

    The length and size of a big rig truck means that it has several blind spots. These danger zones can lead to catastrophic accidents if you find yourself lingering in them.

    Generally, a truck’s blind spots are located along the sides and directly behind and in front of them. The right side in particular is a large blind spot that can span two lanes because the driver sits on the opposite side of the truck.

    To avoid cruising in a truck driver’s blind spots, signal clearly and pass them quickly and cautiously. Also, avoid tailgating by giving yourself plenty of space between the front end of your vehicle and the back end of a truck. A helpful tip to remember is that if you can’t see the truck driver in their side mirrors, chances are they can’t see you either.

    2. Be mindful of turn lanes

    Semi-trucks take wide turns. So, they need ample room from all drivers for making both left and right-handed turns. If there are two turn lanes available, a truck will most likely be in the furthest lane from the curb or the centerline depending on which way they’re turning.

    When you pull up on the inside of a truck that needs to make a turn, chances are when they make their wide turn, they’ll hit you. It’s better to remain behind a truck rather than try to squeeze past them.

    3. Avoid cutting in front of a truck

    Cutting off a truck can result in a collision for a number of reasons. Semi-trucks and other large commercial vehicles take longer to come to a stop. So, if you cut in front of them unexpectedly, they won’t have the time they need to slow down and avoid rear-ending you.

    Additionally, as mentioned above, cutting directly in front of a semi-truck means you’re moving right into one of their blind spots. Before pulling in front of a semi-truck, always make sure you can see the full front of the truck in your side mirrors. Even then, it never hurts to wait a little longer to leave an extra cushion between you.

    Remembering these tips and using caution in the presence of big rig trucks can help you stay safe while sharing the road with semis. Our Charlotte Personal Injury Lawyer handles accident cases throughout the Carolinas. Contact us today if you have any questions.

  • 3 Safety Tips for Sharing the Road with Big Rigs

    Semi-trucks, sometimes called big rigs, are a common sight along the highways of North Carolina. They’re crucial for transporting goods and merchandise and usually make long hauls to do so. But because of their size, they can be intimidating to share the road with.

    If you’re not careful, semi-trucks can also be dangerous. Though you can’t control how attentive or reliable a semi-truck driver is, there are safety measures you can take to help avoid devastating collisions.

    1. Stay out of a truck’s blind spots

    The length and size of a big rig truck means that it has several blind spots. These danger zones can lead to catastrophic accidents if you find yourself lingering in them.

    Generally, a truck’s blind spots are located along the sides and directly behind and in front of them. The right side in particular is a large blind spot that can span two lanes because the driver sits on the opposite side of the truck.

    To avoid cruising in a truck driver’s blind spots, signal clearly and pass them quickly and cautiously. Also, avoid tailgating by giving yourself plenty of space between the front end of your vehicle and the back end of a truck. A helpful tip to remember is that if you can’t see the truck driver in their side mirrors, chances are they can’t see you either.

    2. Be mindful of turn lanes

    Semi-trucks take wide turns. So, they need ample room from all drivers for making both left and right-handed turns. If there are two turn lanes available, a truck will most likely be in the furthest lane from the curb or the centerline depending on which way they’re turning.

    When you pull up on the inside of a truck that needs to make a turn, chances are when they make their wide turn, they’ll hit you. It’s better to remain behind a truck rather than try to squeeze past them.

    3. Avoid cutting in front of a truck

    Cutting off a truck can result in a collision for a number of reasons. Semi-trucks and other large commercial vehicles take longer to come to a stop. So, if you cut in front of them unexpectedly, they won’t have the time they need to slow down and avoid rear-ending you.

    Additionally, as mentioned above, cutting directly in front of a semi-truck means you’re moving right into one of their blind spots. Before pulling in front of a semi-truck, always make sure you can see the full front of the truck in your side mirrors. Even then, it never hurts to wait a little longer to leave an extra cushion between you.

    Remembering these tips and using caution in the presence of big rig trucks can help you stay safe while sharing the road with semis.

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